2018 Conference Program

Saturday April 7
Track A Track B
8:00-9:00 REGISTRATION/BREAKFAST/

EXHIBITOR

9:00-9:30 WELCOME
9:30-11:00 Management by Walking Around, Part 1, AKA Please Don’t “Prowl, Growl and Scowl”

Gilda Bonanno

Doing More with Less: Focusing on Leadership Giving in a Small Shop

Susan B. Linker

11:00-11:30 BREAK
11:30-1:00 Management by Walking Around, Part 2, AKA Please Don’t “Prowl, Growl and Scowl”

Gilda Bonanno

Direct Mail and your Donor Base, the nuts and bolts of successful appeals

Erica Waasdorp

1:00-2:00 VENDOR & EXHIBITOR LUNCH
2:00-3:30 Empowering Employees: Three Lessons, Three Tools
Lisa Leary
Share More Impact: Enhance Your Digital Communications to Donors

Sue Citro

3:30-3:45 VENDOR & EXHIBITOR BREAK
3:45-5:15 There’s no “I” in TEAM: Coaching & Motivating for Maximum Impact

Jim Tedford

Breathing New Life Into Your Philanthropy Operation

Jill Beckwith

Sunday April 8
Track A Track B Track C
8:00-9:00 REGISTRATION/BREAKFAST/EXHIBITOR
9:00-9:30 WELCOME
9:30-11:00 Nerd alert! Publicly available data saves lives

Susanne Kogut

Susan Cosby

Trouble Comes in Threes: Conquering Three of the Biggest Threats to Kitten Health

Rosemarie Crawford

The Community Medicine movement in Veterinary Medicine: How innovative models are providing accessible care to underserved communities across the country

Emily McCobb

11:00-11:30 VENDOR & EXHIBITOR BREAK
11:30-1:00 First Responder Pet First Aid and CPR with Oxygen Mask training

Jim Helems

Do we really have fewer cats?

Katie Lisnik

Danielle Jo Bays

How to transform your organization into a force for social change

Kenny Lamberti

1:00-2:00 VENDOR & EXHIBITOR LUNCH
2:00-3:30 Housing Designs that work
Greg Taylor
Helping shelter staff achieve fast, appropriate outcomes for cats who are not obviously socialized: the Feline Spectrum Assessment

Margaret Slater

Thinking beyond adoptions: Do we really want to put ourselves out of business, and are we ready?

Carmine Dicenso,

Mike Keiley

3:30-3:45 VENDOR & EXHIBITOR BREAK
3:45-5:15 The Cure for Compassion Fatigue: Programs That Will Save Lives and Change Yours

B.J. Rogers,

Cynthia Karsten

Trap, Neuter, Return: the past, present and future.

Stacy LeBaron,

Emily McCobb,

Margaret Slater

Building Relationships of Trust: The Key to Achieving Successful and Long-lasting Collaborations

Tracy Kelley

Monday April 9
Track A Track B Track C
8:00-9:00 REGISTRATION/BREAKFAST/EXHIBITOR
9:00-9:30 WELCOME
9:30-11:00 Bridging the gap between animal control and animal welfare

Kevin Hearst

Showcasing Adoptable Pets Through Photos and Videos: Increasing Visibility, Interest, Traffic and Maybe Adoptions Too

Seana Dowling-Guyer,

Behavior Assessments for Shelter Dogs- What we do and do not know

Sara L. Bennett

11:00-11:30 VENDOR & EXHIBITOR BREAK
11:30-1:00 Working With Homeless Pet Owners

Todd Stosuy

Can’t touch this! Successfully adopting out cats & kittens who can’t be touched

Alanna Regan

Karina King

Behavioral Impact of Puppy Mill and Hoarding Environments

Sara L. Bennett

1:00-2:00 VENDOR & EXHIBITOR LUNCH
2:00-3:30 Dealing with wildlife for the ACO

Deanna Gualtieri

Thinking Outside the Litterbox: Helping our Community Solve Cat Behavior Problems

Amanda Kowalski

Troubleshooting Transport

Stephanie Janeczko

Karen S Walsh

3:30-3:45 BREAK
3:45-5:15 Coexisting With Coyotes

John Maguranis

Integrating Shelter Animals Into Homes with Pets

Lindsay Hamrick

Troubleshooting Transport

Stephanie Janeczko

Karen S Walsh

Sessions Details:

 

Saturday, April 7th: Program Descriptions
Track A
9:30 – 11:00 Management by Walking Around, Part 1, AKA Please Don’t “Prowl, Growl and Scowl”

Management by walking around (MBWA) is a common management practice that can be very helpful in managing and engaging employees, setting a good example, and staying in touch with what’s really happening with employees. The session will cover:

  • Why great managers use MBWA
  • Common MBWA pitfalls to avoid
  • Making sure your non-verbal communication (body language) supports your message
  • How to make MBWA part of your regular routine

Click to download a handout to accompany the presentation.

Gilda Bonanno, Principal, Gilda Bonanno LLC

Gilda Bonanno is a speaker, trainer, and coach who helps her clients improve their presentation, communication, and leadership skills so they can be more successful. Since 2006, she has worked with executives and employees on four continents, from Chicago to Shanghai and Rio to Rome. She is a certified Project Management Practitioner (PMP), holds a master’s degree from Fordham University, and an Advance Business Certificate in Management from the UConn School of Business.

11:30 – 1:00 Management by Walking Around, Part 2, AKA Please Don’t “Prowl, Growl and Scowl”

If you missed part one, you’ll still gain benefit from attending this session, which will focus on:

    • Asking open-ended questions to get information and feedback
    • Active listening
    • Demonstrating authentic leadership presence
    • Overcoming challenges

Click to download a handout to accompany the presentation.

Gilda Bonanno, Principal, Gilda Bonanno LLC

Gilda Bonanno is a speaker, trainer, and coach who helps her clients improve their presentation, communication, and leadership skills so they can be more successful. Since 2006, she has worked with executives and employees on four continents, from Chicago to Shanghai and Rio to Rome. She is a certified Project Management Practitioner (PMP), holds a master’s degree from Fordham University, and an Advance Business Certificate in Management from the UConn School of Business.

2:00 – 3:30 Empowering Employees: Three Lessons, Three Tools

This workshop will focus on employee empowerment, what it is and why it is critical component for success. Participants will learn how empowerment can lead to greater employee satisfaction, financial gains and operational improvements. Key components include: 1.) What drives engagement and motivation 2.) The importance of level playing fields 3.) The role of leadership to support empowered staff and systems improvement.

This will be a dynamic presentation including discussion and group exercises to ensure participants are engaged and leave the workshop with the knowledge, skills and tools to create an empowered work staff.

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.

Click to download Core Process Survey.

Click to download Meeting Agenda Template.

Click to download Meeting Roles PDF.

 

Lisa Leary, MS, Quality Improvement Advisor, www.creatingpawsitivechange.com

Lisa has been working in the field of quality improvement for over 15 years. Her approach is collaborative – working with front line staff to identify opportunities to improve operational workflows, increase satisfaction and achieve organizational goals. Lisa is passionate about supporting individuals on the front line of care – helping to reduce barriers and bring greater satisfaction to the workplace.
Lisa holds a Master of Science in Evaluative Clinical Science from Dartmouth College. She is also a Certified Six Sigma Green Belt.

3:45 – 5:15 There’s no “I” in TEAM: Coaching & Motivating for Maximum Impact

Would you rather be a boss or a coach? Learn how to get the most from your team including tactics for leading by example. We will cover the importance of incremental performance communication versus the standard once-a-year performance review. We’ll talk about making the best hiring decisions and about making other tough HR decisions quickly yet humanely. Hear some great advice from some of animal welfare’s most successful “coaches”.

 

Jim Tedford, President & CEO, Society of Animal Welfare Administrators (SAWA)

Jim Tedford has been actively engaged in the animal welfare movement for more than 33 years. He currently serves as President & CEO for the Society of Animal Welfare Administrators (SAWA), a professional association of leaders in the fields of animal welfare and animal care & control.
Tedford has been CEO for organizations in New York, Louisiana and Tennessee. He served as a regional director for The Humane Society of the United States. Jim has presented at national and regional conferences on various animal welfare issues, organizational development and not-for-profit management.
Jim holds a degree in animal science from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

 

Track B
9:30 – 11:00 Doing More with Less: Focusing on Leadership Giving in a Small Shop

Small organizations have limited or no dedicated fundraising staff, so it can be a challenge to develop a leadership giving program. However, whether you’re raising $100,000 or $1,000,000, the same best practices prevail. It’s all about efficiency.

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.

Susan B. Linker, Chief Executive Office and Founder, Our Companions Animal Rescue

Susan Linker founded Our Companions Animal Rescue, a nonprofit organization in 2002. Our Companions operates its Valerie Friedman Program Center in Manchester and a 47 acre Animal Sanctuary in Ashford, CT.
Susan also serves as Connecticut’s representative on HSUS’s Companion Animal Advisory Council and is a Board Member of CT Votes for Animals, a bipartisan political organization.
Prior to establishing Our Companions, Susan worked in various capacities at the Connecticut Humane Society and Fox Memorial Clinic.
Susan also spent some time outside the animal welfare field where she pursued financial development experience with the American Red Cross.

11:30 – 1:00 Direct Mail and your Donor Base, the nuts and bolts of successful appeals

Direct mail is still one of the most cost-effective ways to appeal to your donors. Even though it drives more donors to give online, 90% of all donations still come in via checks.
And 50% of the success of your appeals comes from targeting your donors the right way.
This session will discuss how best to segment your donors and how to develop the best approach for each group.
It also shows you how to create a plan for the year, so you’ll be able to raise more money from your donors to support your programs and help more animals.

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.

 

Erica Waasdorp, President, A Direct Solution

Erica Waasdorp, Consultant, is President of A Direct Solution, located on Cape Cod, MA. Erica works with non-profit clients throughout the US, helping them with direct mail appeals and sustainer acquisition, retention and upgrades. She is a Master Trainer for the Association of Fundraising Professionals, and wrote and published one of the leading books on sustainer programs, Monthly Giving—The Sleeping Giant. She co-authored the DonorPerfect Monthly Giving Starter and Marketing Kits, created the Monthly Donor Road Map and blogs on #MonthlyDonorMondays for Nonprofit Pro, and presents in person and via webinars.
For more information, go to www.adirectsolution.com

2:00 – 3:30 Share More Impact: Enhance Your Digital Communications to Donors

Each day, you and your organization work improving the lives of animals. But how well do you communicate to your donors and social media followers about your work and the impact generated? Does it seem overwhelming with new tools, technologies, or never enough time, staff or volunteers to help? In this session, we’ll evaluate and enhance the effectiveness of your email, digital and video communications across a wide range of different donor and supporter types. You’ll learn about new tools, tips and time-saving tricks you can start using today to enhance communications for your adoption, fundraising and volunteer programs too.

 

Sue Citro, Chief Digital Officer, Best Friends Animal Society

Sue Citro is the Chief Digital Officer at Best Friends Animal Society. Her focus is on driving innovation and life-saving through the organization’s digital and mobile channels. Before joining Best Friends, Sue led new digital expansions for The Nature Conservancy in Asia and Latin America. She also grew the organization’s U.S. digital revenue practice into a steady and reliable funding source. Sue is obsessed with increasing revenue for organizations and holds a master’s degree from Johns Hopkins University. She lives in Massachusetts with her husband, Jeremy, and rescue dog, Marcus the Rottweiler.

3:45 – 5:15 Breathing New Life Into Your Philanthropy Operation

In this workshop, we’ll discuss the importance of creating an organization-wide culture of philanthropy that extends beyond the development team. We’ll review fundraising strategies that engage staff at all levels and help overcome anxiety about asking for donations. Further, we’ll talk about the importance of creating optimistic, donor-centered fundraising programs which move away from the all-too-common gloomy tales of suffering and give donors a sense of purpose, agency and hope when engaging with your organization.

 

Jill Beckwith, Chief Philanthropy Officer, Emancipet

As Chief Philanthropy Officer of Emancipet, Jill leads efforts to raise contributed revenue in support of Emancipet’s existing and future clinics.

Jill worked as a political and community organizer in Chicago for ten years. She also lobbied for affordable housing at the municipal, state, and federal levels. Just prior to joining Emancipet in 2010, Jill worked for a Chicago-based political consulting firm on direct mail campaigns for unions, political candidates and advocacy groups on issues ranging from women’s health to immigration reform.

Jill earned a B.A. from Randolph-Macon Woman’s College in 1998.

 

Sunday, April 8th: Program Descriptions
Track A
9:30 – 11:00

Nerd alert! Publicly available data saves lives

While it may seem daunting to some, collecting and making everyone’s data publicly available, has far reaching impact beyond your home town. Using real life examples including state-wide databases and tools like Shelter Animals Count, we’ll examine benefits and insights of statewide and national data collection. We’ll demonstrate how data can identify trends and target pockets of increased need with real life examples. Additionally we’ll provide insight into the Petco Foundation’s methodology of using data in grant funding decisions, and explore how other funders are approaching data transparency and the move towards publicly shared information.

Susanne Kogut, Executive Director, Petco Foundation
Susanne Kogut is the Executive Director of the Petco Foundation. Prior to joining Petco, she was the Charlottesville-Albemarle SPCA ED, where she transformed the open-admission SPCA from an organization with financial problems, contentious volunteer/employee relationships, and a high euthanasia rate into an award-winning, model organization recognized nationally for its lifesaving efforts.

Before embarking on her animal welfare career, Susanne held several positions at Capital One Financial Corporation, including associate general counsel and director of community reinvestment. Prior to that, she was a corporate finance & securities attorney in the D.C. offices of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher and Brown & Wood.

Susan Cosby, Director of Lifesaving Programs, Petco Foundation

Ms. Cosby serves as the Petco Foundation’s Director of Lifesaving Programs and Partnerships overseeing the alignment and forward progress of both the adoption and investment (grants) programs.

Prior to joining the Foundation her experience included CEO, Executive Director and other leadership roles at both open and limited admission, public animal control and private shelters. Throughout her career she has utilized customer focused, data driven strategies, and a sense of urgency to improve organizational performance and increase lives saved.

11:30 – 1:00

First Responder Pet First Aid and CPR with Oxygen Mask training

Training will be conducted with life sized stuffed dogs and Powerpoint By the end of the presentation you will have a clear understanding of how you can save a pet’s life.

This class normally runs 5 – 6 hours and covers over 50 Pet First Aid and CPR techniques that can save your pets life. In this shortened class we will only cover

Pet CPR techniques (Side to Side, Barrel and Taco)
Pet Choking using Pet Thrusts
Emergency bleeding protocols
Use of Pet Oxygen Masks

Jim Helems, CMPTI, CDTI Certified Master Pet Tech Instructor SOLO Wilderness First Aid Instructor Training Coordinator Dakin Pioneer Valley Humane Society Jim Helems Dog Pals

Jim has been training dogs all his life, but after retiring from the U.S. Air Force, he started working with dogs in Behavior Modification, Dog Sports and basic dog training skills (from puppies to adults) With 22 years as a military medic (working in Intensive Care Units, Emergency Rooms and as a Flight Medic during the Gulf War) he feels teaching pet owners how they could save their pet’s life is an important goal as part of his company, Dog Pals. Certified as a Pet Tech Instructor and a Master Instructor allowing him to “Train the Trainer” is helping to achieve this goal.

2:00 – 3:30

Housing Designs that Work

It is hard to over emphasize the importance of designing and selecting the right enclosures for your shelter. The public wants to feel good when walking through the adoption area, newly admitted animals need to be protected and secured, and sick and quarantined animals have their own special requirements. All these desires also must be balanced with safety for facility staff and the public, as well as disease prevention and operating efficiency. Even a beautiful new building on the perfect location will falter if mistakes are made in these decisions. In addition, the animal enclosures are often one of the biggest line items in the construction or renovation budget.

This presentation will focus on current trends in housing for shelters and animal control, including intake, quarantine and adoption.

The choices have grown dramatically in recent years to include offerings made from a variety of materials and incorporating new designs. The presentation will cover the pros and cons of different materials; how ventilation can be incorporated into units with glass fronts or restricted airflow; modular units; cleaning issues; and of course, cost. The presentation will also review some of the recent trends in the design and layout of housing to promote adoption rates.

Gate and kennel accessories such as tempered glass vs welded wire bars, bowl and water feeding systems, rest benches, guillotine doors, top covers, and isolation panels will be covered. “Real life” rooms, double deck and stacked runs all have gained in popularity and will be explored as facilities realize that every kennel doesn’t need to be the same and there are some benefits to specialization and flexibility. The presentation will also review some of the recent trends in the design and layout of kennels and adoption rooms to promote better health and adoption rates. The audience will have time at the end to ask questions.

Key concepts that attendee will learn:

  • Learn how to design flexibility into kennels to increase efficiency and capacity for peak times.
  • Learn how to design kennel runs to promote healthier, less stressful animals, increase adoption and decrease illness.

Greg Taylor, CEO, Mason Company, LLC

Mason Company, founded in 1892, is the leading designer and manufacturer of animal enclosures for humane societies, veterinarians and other animal facilities. Mason has developed the widest product line in the industry and has 12 patents, including the Sani-Slope™ and Silvis Seal™. Mason sells around the world, has installations in over 30 countries, and has worked with many animal facilities to develop animal housing unique to their facility’s needs. Greg is a contributor to animal care periodicals and frequent speaker at animal care conferences. He earned a BA from Denison University and a MBA from the University of Chicago.

3:45 – 5:15

The Cure for Compassion Fatigue: Programs That Will Save Lives and Change Yours

Given work that can be grueling, emotional and exhausting – even while fulfilling, rewarding and inspiring – many organizations spend loads of resources implementing strategies to address burnout and compassion fatigue. Often efforts to provide comfort and support to staff only treat symptoms. What if the challenge isn’t the work itself, but how we DO that work?

We’ll look at three initiatives, not just as they impact live release rates, but as they impact the PEOPLE doing the work. Perhaps more than any recent program innovations, these initiatives have welfare-increasing potential for pets AND people – reducing stressful interactions, gut-wrenching decisions, and shifting focus – from the things we cannot control, to the things we can.

Click to download the To-DON’T List.

Click to download Alternatives to Intake Decision Criteria Matrix.

 

B.J. Rogers, CAWA, CDET

B.J. most recently led the team responsible for ASPCApro.org – the premier online resource providing content and resources to support the critical work of shelters and rescues around the country. Prior to joining the ASPCA, B.J. served as chief executive of the Humane Society of Chittenden County. B.J. has also held various executive positions in the human service sector and has worked in higher education as both an instructor and researcher, and in politics as a press secretary. He’s a Certified Animal Welfare Administrator (CAWA), a Certified Dialogue Education Teacher (CDET) and has training in mediation and Appreciative Inquiry.


Cynthia Karsten, DVM, DABVP (Shelter Medicine Practice), Outreach Veterinarian, UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program

Cynthia (Cindy) Karsten, DVM, finished her shelter medicine residency at UC Davis in 2014 and is now the outreach veterinarian with the UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program. Her main role is helping shelters in any and all capacity that she can (from email questions to focused on-site consultations), creating resources and doing research to improve shelter animal welfare and guiding veterinary students to help all pets and pet owners in their community.

Track B
9:30 – 11:00

Trouble Comes in Threes: Conquering Three of the Biggest Threats to Kitten Health

We know that those who care for kittens often learn lessons the hard way – because of the kittens they couldn’t save or because of the struggles experienced while saving them. Wouldn’t it be nice if we didn’t have to learn from trial and error, and instead could learn those life-saving lessons before actually needing them? With proper and proactive treatment, three of the biggest threats that frequently kill kittens – upper respiratory infections, diarrhea and fading kitten syndrome – can often be conquered. We will look at the causes, signs, dangers and treatment options for these threats to kittens’ health.

Click to download the presentation handout.

Rosemarie Crawford, LVT, Director of Educational Programs, The National Kitten Coalition

Rosemarie Crawford is a licensed veterinary technician with 15+ years’ experience in animal welfare. As a medical staff member in a high-volume, open-access shelter in Illinois, Rosemarie worked closely with the shelter veterinarian to provide for the animals’ medical and surgical needs. She assisted in developing and implementing progressive, proactive protocols for the care and treatment of kittens in the shelter’s nursery and foster program. She is co-founder of The National Kitten Coalition and also continues working at a large veterinary practice in northern VA. When not traveling, she often fosters ill or injured kittens for local shelters and rescues.

11:30 – 1:00

Do we really have fewer cats?

Cat transport is now widely practiced in New England, and other northern parts of the country. But do we really have fewer cats in New England than we used to have? How do we know? Are we sure that our programs and policies have achieved the goals we were aiming for? This class will look at new measurement techniques to determine if there are fewer cats on the landscape- and will discuss all the programs and projects that are needed to address cats at the population level.

Click to download PDF of handouts for the presentation: Handout #1 Handout #2

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.

Katie Lisnik, Director of Companion Animal Public Policy, The Humane Society of the United States

Katie Lisnik is the Director of Companion Animal Public Policy at The Humane Society of the United States, focusing on increasing humane policy for dogs, cats and other companion animals, as well as keeping more pets in their homes and preserving a strong human-animal bond. Katie has an MS in Animals and Public Policy from Tufts University; she is the Past President of the New England Federation of Humane Societies; and former advisor to the Maine Federation of Humane Societies. Katie has also served as the Maine State Director, and Director of Cat Protection and Policy for The HSUS.


Danielle Jo Bays, Community Cat Program Manager, The Humane Society of the United States

Danielle Jo Bays is the Community Cats Program Manager for The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), utilizing her skills in public policy, hands-on TNR, networking and resource development to expand The HSUS’s community cat work nationwide. Prior to rejoining The HSUS, Danielle served as the Program Manager for the community cats program at the Washington Humane Society in Washington, D.C. and continues to be a strong and passionate voice for community cats in her neighborhood and city.

2:00 – 3:30

Helping shelter staff achieve fast, appropriate outcomes for cats who are not obviously socialized: the Feline Spectrum Assessment

The Feline Spectrum Assessment (FSA) is a validated tool to help identify more and less socialized cats in a shelter setting. Learn how FSA might help your shelter! A behavior checklist component can be used to teach staff about socialized cat behaviors. Use FSA to quickly help assess a cat’s likely level of socialization to guide placement of cats for adoption, RTF, barn cat placement, behavior modification and foster care or alternative housing. Help your shelter rapidly determine a cat’s best pathway for a prompt outcome to support the health and well-being of cats in our care.

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.

Margaret Slater, DVM, PhD, Senior Director, Research & Development, Department of Strategy, Research & Development, ASPCA

Dr. Slater obtained her DVM and PhD from Cornell University. Dr. Slater was at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University from 1990 until 2008 when she joined the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Dr. Slater is recognized for her work on the problems and solutions for free-roaming cats and dogs. Present projects range from outcomes in blocked cats to increasing pet welfare in under-served neighborhoods.

Dr. Slater has more than 115 peer-reviewed publications and 2 books and authored a chapter on the behavioral ecology of free-roaming cats for Animal Behavior for Shelter Medicine and Staff.

3:45 – 5:15 Trap, Neuter, Return: the past, present and future.

This workshop will discuss the history and current practices for TNR with an emphasis on community collaborations to address the overpopulation of free roaming cats. We will discuss how we know TNR works and how TNR programs can be incorporated into a modern new England shelter to help further the shelter’s mission. Highlights from the Community Cat Podcast will be used to help us consider the future of community cat management.

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.


Stacy LeBaron, former ED, Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society- currently directs the Community Cats Podcast

Stacy LeBaron has been involved in animal welfare for over 20 years. She currently hosts a three day a week podcast called the Community Cats Podcast (www.communitycatspodcast.com) where she interviews nationally and internationally renowned experts helping with the problem of cat over population and cat welfare. Previous to starting the Community Cats Podcast, she served for sixteen years as President of the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society (www.mrfrs.org). Since 1992, the MRFRS has assisted over 115,000 cats and kittens through a variety of innovative programs.

 

Emily McCobb DVM MS DACVAA, Program Director, Tufts Shelter Medicine, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine
Dr. Emily McCobb is Director of the Tufts Shelter Medicine Program and the Luke and Lily Lerner Spay Neuter Clinic at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. McCobb works to support community programs at the Cummings School and assisted in opening the Tufts at Tech Community Veterinary Clinic in 2012. Tufts at Tech is student run low cost clinic serving under-served clients in Worcester. Tufts Shelter Medicine also runs weekly outreach clinics for underserved pets in Worcester in collaboration with Becker College. Dr. McCobb speaks nationally on spay neuter and community based veterinary medicine.

 

Margaret Slater, DVM, PhD, Senior Director, Research & Development, Department of Strategy, Research & Development, ASPCA

Dr. Slater obtained her DVM and PhD from Cornell University. Dr. Slater was at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University from 1990 until 2008 when she joined the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Dr. Slater is recognized for her work on the problems and solutions for free-roaming cats and dogs. Present projects range from outcomes in blocked cats to increasing pet welfare in underserved neighborhoods.

Dr. Slater has more than 115 peer-reviewed publications and 2 books and authored a chapter on the behavioral ecology of free-roaming cats for Animal Behavior for Shelter Medicine and Staff.

Track C
9:30 – 11:00

The Community Medicine movement in Veterinary Medicine: How innovative models are providing accessible care to under-served communities across the country

This 90 minute work shop will discuss the emerging area of community based veterinary medicine and efforts to provide accessible veterinary services to all pet owners. We will discuss what barriers currently exist towards receiving veterinary care in certain communities and different models for overcoming those barrier will be reviewed. We will focus on case examples to illustrate a variety of programs and program models. Discussion and sharing of wise practices will be encouraged. Finally, we will review the role of different community partners such as educational institutions, human service agencies and animal welfare organizations for achieving success with your program.

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.

Emily McCobb DVM MS DACVAA, Program Director, Tufts Shelter Medicine, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine
Dr. Emily McCobb is Director of the Tufts Shelter Medicine Program and the Luke and Lily Lerner Spay Neuter Clinic at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. McCobb works to support community programs at the Cummings School and assisted in opening the Tufts at Tech Community Veterinary Clinic in 2012. Tufts at Tech is student run low cost clinic serving under-served clients in Worcester. Tufts Shelter Medicine also runs weekly outreach clinics for underserved pets in Worcester in collaboration with Becker College. Dr. McCobb speaks nationally on spay neuter and community based veterinary medicine.

11:30 – 1:00

How to transform your organization into a force for social change

The first job of leadership is to build and maintain a healthy positive organizational culture. From board members to volunteers, everyone should have clear vision of the mission and philosophy of your organization. A healthy positive culture embraces an inclusive approach to hiring and idea sharing. A fully engaged and happy staff will ultimately be more productive, and project that same positive attitude when dealing with clients and community stakeholders. When an organization shares the same vision and supports each other from top down, it can be a powerful force for change.

Kenny Lamberti, Director County Leader Program, The Humane Society of the United States

Kenny Lamberti is Director of the County Leader Program for The Humane Society of the United States and played a key role in the creation and implementation of its Pets for Life program. Kenny came to The HSUS with a background in social work, teaching and grass roots community organizing. Kenny has led community-based programs for nationally recognized organizations such as the YMCA, Harvard University and the Boston Public Schools. Kenny is a champion of equality and inclusion, which has framed his holistic approach to engaging animal lovers and advocates from diverse backgrounds, with the hope of creating a more humane global community.

2:00 – 3:30

Thinking beyond adoptions: Do we really want to put ourselves out of business, and are we ready?

This facilitated discussion style presentation will focus on the topic of what our mission has become in New England animal welfare. Many organizations in New England operate limited admission facilities for local animals and actively import animals from areas with significant overpopulation. A focus on adoption has helped to save many homeless animals entering shelters throughout the US and beyond, but resources for at risk animals in our community are still under represented in New England. The question we will explore is if a focus on adoption as our main mission has unintentionally left local animals at risk.


Carmine Dicenso, Executive Director, Dakin Humane Society

Carmine DiCenso has been working in animal welfare since 1996. He is the executive director at Dakin Humane Society, where he oversees all aspects of the organization’s work at its two locations in Leverett and Springfield, MA. Dakin has more than 50 employees and nearly 800 volunteers who shelter, treat and foster more than 16,000 animals annually.

Mike Keiley, Director of Adoption Centers and Programs, MSPCA-Angell

Mike Keiley has been working in animal welfare since 1994 and is currently the Director of Adoption Centers and Programs for the MSPCA. He oversees the programs and operations of the MSPCA’s four adoption centers and three public spay/neuter clinics in Centerville, Boston and Methuen Massachusetts. The Methuen Adoption Center includes an equine and farm animal adoption center.

3:45 – 5:15

Building Relationships of Trust: The Key to Achieving Successful and Long-lasting Collaborations.

Do you want to save more lives? Collaboration and coalition building are proven agents of change in animal welfare. But how does true collaboration begin? At the most basic level, it centers on trust, without which, failure is imminent. How do you build that trust? This interactive workshop, designed for anyone at any level within animal welfare will teach you how to gain and foster trust among your peers, as well as give you some practical tools and tips for building effective relationships to further your and your organization’s goals. Come prepared to share, listen and trust!

Tracy Kelley, NKUT Coalition Specialist, Best Friends Animal Society – Utah

Tracy Kelley, NKUT Coalition Specialist for Best Friends Animal Society, leads a coalition of nearly 60 rescue groups, municipal shelters, and support organizations on track to make Utah no-kill by 2019.

Leaving the corporate world in 2001, Tracy began her career in animal welfare as Volunteer Coordinator for No More Homeless Pets in Utah. After a stint as Affiliate Manager for Susan G. Komen – Utah, she returned to Best Friends as National Volunteer Manager.

Tracy serves as Vice President on the board of Wildlife S.O.S, an international conservation organization, and is thrilled to advocate for India’s abused and endangered wildlife.

Monday, April 9th: Program Descriptions
Track A
9:30 – 11:00

Bridging the gap between animal control and animal welfare

How to process (impounded stray, seized, cruelty, abandon, dangerous animals) within 30 days of intake.
Shelter safety inspection
Shelter handling safety measures
Officer safety inspection
Emergency animal handling
Signs of stress and potential predatory aggression
Placement evaluation (how to screen potential adopters with positive results).

Click here to download a PDF of the presentation.

Kevin Hearst, Animal Cruelty Investigator, K.D.H. Consulting

Kevin D. Hearst Sr. was hired by DeKalb County Animal control in August 1994, where he received several commendations for Officer of the month and quarter for 1994 & 1995. He continued to collect numerous awards for his outstanding field work and problem solving techniques between disgruntled neighbors. Using learned animal behavior methods from past positions as a kennel attendant, veterinarian and surgery assistant at Peachtree Animal hospital and Petsmart; Officer Hearst increased his efficiency and effectiveness.
Kevin was trained by former Special Operations Squad officers and acquired skills to rapidly capture and restrain aggressive canines during narcotic raids.

He attended NACA as well as attended Law Enforcement Training Institutes’ Animal Cruelty School.

Officer Hearst was promoted to Chief cruelty investigator in 2008, by DeKalb County Animal Services & Enforcements’ Director Mooneyham. 2008 – 2011 DeKalb Animal services & Enforcement had handled approximately 2,165 Cruelty/Neglect cases, 759 Abandonment cases and 248 Dangerous Animal cases.

In 2010 Officer Hearst was hired to teach at the University of Missouri’s National Cruelty Investigation School, then in 2016 was given the opportunity to speak for the HSUS as one of several team instructors.

Kevin Hearst is a frequent speaker and guest lecturer on issues of animal cruelty, and has provided free training to many Law Enforcement and other professionals throughout his 24 years in animal cruelty field.

11:30 – 1:00

Working With Homeless Pet Owners

Working with persons in the homeless community who own animals can be challenging, especially when there are issues with mental illness or drug abuse. This workshop will offer insight into positive ways animal care and control officers can work with the homeless to ensure their animals are altered, vaccinated, microchipped and provided with appropriate care. It will offer tips for interacting positively with homeless pet owners to create effective long-term change.

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.

Officer Todd Stosuy, Field Services Manager, Santa Cruz County Animal Shelter

Officer Todd Stosuy is the Field Services Manager for the Santa Cruz County Animal Shelter and has been with the Agency since 2003. Todd has two Bachelors degrees from Rutgers University, one in Criminal Justice and the second in Sociology. Todd served on the board of directors for the National Animal Care and Control Association (NACA) from 2008 to 2017 and was President from 2010 to 2015. Prior to working with animals Todd was an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) and a first grade teacher.

2:00 – 3:30

Dealing with wildlife for the ACO

Most of the general public have no idea what is normal and what is not when it comes to wildlife. This will give you a basic overview about how to deal with many of the common wildlife calls that come in to animal control. It will give you an understanding of the natural behavior of certain wildlife, assessing certain animals for illness and injuries, and determining if wildlife rehabilitation is necessary or even an option. It will assist in determining if a baby animal is actually orphaned and needs a rehabber, and how to find a rehabilitator and capture and transport considerations.

Click here to download a PDF of the presentation.

Deanna Gualtieri, Animal Control Officer & Certified Wildlife Rehabilitator, Waltham, MA

Deanna Gualtieri has been the Animal Control Officer for the City of Waltham since 2012. She graduated from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst with a bachelor degree in animal science. Working as an emergency dispatcher in Waltham prior to transitioning to the Animal Control Officer, it was apparent there was a need for help with the wild animals as well as the domestic. She became a certified wildlife rehabilitator and is a co-founder of the non-profit wildlife rescue NEW ARC, (North East Wildlife Animal Rehabilitation Coalition), averaging about 600 wildlife intakes a year.

3:45 – 5:15 Coexisting With Coyotes
An Educational Presentation Regarding Coyotes with special Emphasis on Hazing. Topics and areas of discussion:

  • Natural Behavior myths and facts
  • Habits
  • Diet
  • Identification
  • Photography
  • Pet and Human Safety
  • Hazing

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.

John Maguranis, Massachusetts Representative for Project Coyote & and Belmont Animal Control Officer

John Maguranis served as a US Army veterinary technician for more than 20 years. Upon retiring from the army, John became an ACO in Massachusetts. Program educates communities about why coyotes matter ecologically and deserve respect and appreciation. John has been recognized by the State and is now a State Continuing Education trainer for ACOs, empowering them with the tools, information, and resources they need to coexist with coyotes. John has worked collaboratively with many organizations and researchers throughout New England. John’s passion and engaging personality have been instrumental in fostering educated coexistence and conservation throughout New England. His ability to present it in a way that is meaningful and memorable has earned him recognition throughout the North East.

Track B
9:30 – 11:00

Showcasing Adoptable Pets Through Photos and Videos: Increasing Visibility, Interest, Traffic and Maybe Adoptions Too

How do we best showcase the animals in our shelter, to increase their visibility and improve their chances for adoption? We will share with you results from research investigating the effects of photograph and video conditions on viewer interest and perceptions that, combined with practical advice from organizations around the region, form a set of best practice recommendations you can take back to your organization and immediately put to use. Discussion and hands-on work with your phone and/or camera will give you a chance to apply and practice these techniques.

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.

Seana Dowling-Guyer, MS, Associate Director, Center for Shelter Dogs, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University

Seana is part of the Center for Animals and Public Policy and teaches in the Masters in Animals and Public Policy program. As Associate Director of the Center for Shelter Dogs, Seana helps set the Center’s strategic direction and priorities, including research conducted by the Center on behalf of dogs in shelters. Seana’s research focuses on improving the welfare and identification of stress of dogs in shelters, gaining a better understanding of the behavior of dogs, and supporting dogs in the home and community. She also is interested in how people’s knowledge and perception of dog behavior influences their relationships with their dogs.

 

11:30 – 1:00

Can’t touch this! Successfully adopting out cats & kittens who can’t be touched

In the past 3 years, Dakin Humane Society has successfully placed in pet homes over 300 cats and kittens who are too fearful to be touched. We’ll share some of the things we have learned about keeping everyone safe (both cats and visitors), marketing these special cats, and what our follow up tells us about how they are doing in their homes. Learn how placing feral kittens directly into homes, “as-is” – instead of socializing them first in foster homes or in your shelter – might be a better choice for the kittens, your organization, and your adopters.

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.

Click to download the following handouts:

Alanna Regan, Feline Success Coordinator, Dakin Humane Society

Alanna Regan has worked with the Dakin Humane Society for over 13 years. She started out as an Adoption Counselor and in July of 2015 was hired as Dakin’s first Feline Success Coordinator. Alanna works with teams of staff members and volunteers to create and run programs such as Dakin’s Spirit Cat Program, Tiny Spirit Program and Barn Cat Program.


Karina King, Director of Operations, Dakin Humane Society

Karina has been at Dakin for over 15 years in a dazzling variety of roles. She enjoys evaluating whether what we think is true is actually true, and trying new things out to see if they work.

2:00 – 3:30

Thinking Outside the Litterbox: Helping our Community Solve Cat Behavior Problems

There are about 3.2 million cats entering shelters each year, most of which are surrendered due to behavior concerns. House soiling, aggression, and inappropriate play are just some of the common problems owners are faced with. This presentation will explore the ways that the San Diego Humane Society prevents cats from entering the shelter with programs that assist community members with solvable behavior problems, as well as how you can start a similar program at your shelter.

Click to download the Behavior Helpline Log Sheet.

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.

Click to download the outlines that were created during the workshop.

 

Amanda Kowalski, Behavior Center Director, San Diego Humane Society

Amanda Kowalski, MS, CPDT-KA serves as the Behavior Center Director for the San Diego Humane Society, where she leads the team of animal trainers and caregivers who provide specialized behavior plans for in-care animals as well as behavior support to members of the San Diego Community. Amanda has specialized in behavioral care in shelters for over ten years and also serves as a member of the Board of Directors for the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers (CCPDT).

Amanda holds a Master’s in Animals and Public Policy from the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, where she was engaged in research focused on improving feline welfare and saving the lives of shelter animals.

3:45 – 5:15

Integrating Shelter Animals Into Homes with Pets

Amanda holds a Master’s in Animals and Public Policy from the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, where she was engaged in research focused on improving feline welfare and saving the lives of shelter animals.

Participants will learn how to responsibly place shelter dogs and cats into homes with other animals. Current trends point to a majority of shelter pets who are restricted from living in homes with other animals and because the majority of homes already have pets, this creates long lengths of stay. Instructions will be provided to safely integrate animals into new homes with resident pets, thereby preventing blanket restrictions and placing more homeless animals into loving homes.

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.

Lindsay Hamrick, NH State Director, The Humane Society of the United States

As New Hampshire State Director for The Humane Society of the United States, Lindsay Hamrick works to strengthen the state’s animal protection laws. She holds a M.S. in Animals & Public Policy from Tufts Veterinary School and was previously the Chief Operating Officer for the Animal Rescue League of New Hampshire. She is Co-Chair of the NH Disaster Animal Response Team, serves as the legislative liaison to the NH Federation of Humane Organization and is a Certified Professional Dog Trainer specializing in the behavioral support of dogs rescued from dogfighting cases.

9:30 – 11:00

Behavior Assessments for Shelter Dogs- What we do and do not know

This lecture will explore the definition of temperament and the utility of several different test formats and measuring tools. The requirements for an accurate and predictive test will be discussed, as well as the current findings in the peer-reviewed scientific literature. Recommendations on how to use the information collected from these testing modalities will be covered.

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.

Sara L. Bennett, DVM, MS, DACVB, Veterinary Behavior Consultations, Owner, Independent Contractor

Dr. Bennett received her DVM degree in 2006 from Purdue University. She spent 3 years in general practice in Southwest Indiana before returning to Purdue to complete a residency in Animal Behavior and Masters of Science. She obtained certification as a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists in 2012. After board-certification, she practiced veterinary behavior in the Chicago area until returning to the Tri-State area in 2015.

Dr. Bennett is a co-instructor for University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine online learning course, Shelter Animal Behavior and Welfare, part of the Maddie’s® Shelter Medicine Program.

11:30 – 1:00

Behavioral Impact of Puppy Mill and Hoarding Environments

The environmental effects of puppy mill and hoarding situations on behavioral development in dogs will be discussed. The general behavior observations of a dog from these environments will be described. How to manage these pets from an environmental, social and behavioral therapy standpoint will be discussed, while in a shelter or foster setting. Medications as part of the treatment plan and prognosis will be included in the discussion.

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.

Sara L. Bennett, DVM, MS, DACVB, Veterinary Behavior Consultations, Owner, Independent Contractor

Dr. Bennett received her DVM degree in 2006 from Purdue University. She spent 3 years in general practice in Southwest Indiana before returning to Purdue to complete a residency in Animal Behavior and Masters of Science. She obtained certification as a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists in 2012. After board-certification, she practiced veterinary behavior in the Chicago area until returning to the Tri-State area in 2015.

Dr. Bennett is a co-instructor for University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine online learning course, Shelter Animal Behavior and Welfare, part of the Maddie’s® Shelter Medicine Program.

2:00 – 3:30

Troubleshooting Transport Part 1

This two-part workshop will explore key aspects of animal relocation programs from the perspective of destination organizations, starting with intake at the source agencies, during transport, and throughout the animals’ time at receiving shelters. Attendees will gain an understanding of the challenges to, responsibilities of, and opportunities for participating agencies with a focus on practical ways that organizations can meet and exceed regulations, laws, and relevant best practices. Real-life examples and case studies will be presented from both operational and shelter medicine perspectives along with plenty of time for discussion and mutual learning to help all organizations elevate their practices.

Click to download a PDF of the presentation.

Stephanie Janeczko, DVM, MS, DABVP, CAWA, Senior Director, Shelter Medical Programs. ASPCA

Dr. Stephanie Janeczko is board certified in both Shelter Medicine and Canine/Feline practice through the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners and is a certified animal welfare administrator. She is a past president and former board member of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians and currently serves as a committee member and board member for several animal welfare and veterinary medical organizations. Dr. Janeczko has a particular interest in infectious disease as well as in the welfare of cats. She is based in New York City and works with animal welfare organizations across the country to improve their shelter medicine programs.


Karen S. Walsh, CAWA, LVMT, CFE, Director, Animal Relocation Initiative. ASPCA

Karen S Walsh, CAWA, LVMT, CFE is the Director of the Animal Relocation Initiative for the ASPCA. Immediately prior to joining the ASPCA she was a Program Manager on the PetSmart Charities Rescue Waggin’. She graduated from Blue Ridge in Virginia with a degree in veterinary technology and has achieved designations as a Certified Animal Welfare Administrator and a Certified Compassion Fatigue Educator. Karen has held leadership positions in both veterinary and animal welfare organizations including appointment to the Tennessee state Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners. Karen lives in Tennessee with her husband, Tom, their children, and a menagerie of furry and feathered family members on their small, but beautiful farm.

3:45 – 5:15

Troubleshooting Transport Part 2

Stephanie Janeczko, DVM, MS, DABVP, CAWA, Senior Director, Shelter Medical Programs. ASPCA

Dr. Stephanie Janeczko is board certified in both Shelter Medicine and Canine/Feline practice through the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners and is a certified animal welfare administrator. She is a past president and former board member of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians and currently serves as a committee member and board member for several animal welfare and veterinary medical organizations. Dr. Janeczko has a particular interest in infectious disease as well as in the welfare of cats. She is based in New York City and works with animal welfare organizations across the country to improve their shelter medicine programs.


Karen S. Walsh, CAWA, LVMT, CFE, Director, Animal Relocation Initiative. ASPCA

Karen S Walsh, CAWA, LVMT, CFE is the Director of the Animal Relocation Initiative for the ASPCA. Immediately prior to joining the ASPCA she was a Program Manager on the PetSmart Charities Rescue Waggin’. She graduated from Blue Ridge in Virginia with a degree in veterinary technology and has achieved designations as a Certified Animal Welfare Administrator and a Certified Compassion Fatigue Educator. Karen has held leadership positions in both veterinary and animal welfare organizations including appointment to the Tennessee state Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners. Karen lives in Tennessee with her husband, Tom, their children, and a menagerie of furry and feathered family members on their small, but beautiful farm.

 

 

Click to download a PDF of the Conference Program.

Animal Control Continuing Education Credits

Several states have offered continuing education credits to Animal Control Officers for attending specific sessions relevant to their field. CLICK to see the approved sessions per state to find out how many CE credits are available to you.