2017 Conference Descriptions

You have the flexibility to attend one, two or all three days of the Conference with registration fees as follows:  $125 for one day; $200 for two days; and $250 for all three days.

LEADERSHIP DAY

Sponsored by the:

ASPCA logo

 

SATURDAY TRACK A

So now you’re a Manager: The most common issues for new managers and how to tackle them  Part 1 & 2

Like most managers in animal welfare, Carmine and I were hired in our first supervisory roles because we were the staff members who had been there the longest and that was our first management experience. Like many other managers, we were trained by trial and error, rather than a structured training plan. This presentation is aimed at identifying the common issues newer managers may face and how to solve them.

To get the most out of my session attendees should have: Basic knowledge of topic

Session is geared towards: 3-7 years experience

In this session we will be reviewing real life scenarios that have been encountered by new managers in New England and having an interactive discussion on how to solve these issues.
Mike Keiley, Director, Noble Family Animal Care and Adoption Center MSPCA at Nevins Farm
Mike Keiley has been working in Animal Welfare since 1994, all at the MSPCA at Nevins Farm. Mike has been the Director at the MSPCA for over 12 years and during that time has orchestrated the adoption program as well as the outreach programs at one of New England’s largest and busiest animal welfare organizations.

Carmine DiCenso, Executive Director, Dakin Humane Society
Carmine DiCenso has been working in animal welfare since 1996. He is the executive director at Dakin Humane Society, where he oversees all aspects of the organization’s work at its two locations in Leverett and Springfield, MA. Dakin has more than 50 employees and nearly 800 volunteers who shelter, treat and foster more than 16,000 animals annually.

 

All the Feels: Exercising Leadership & Managing Change by Cultivating Emotional Intelligence  Part 1 & 2

Change is necessary, yet rarely easy. Leadership is essential, yet often risky. Few of us though, have received training in the tools that make exercising leadership and managing change possible. But what if cultivating one particular tool could make all the difference?
Using the concepts of emotional intelligence as our framework, we’ll explore:

– The critical role of communication skills
– The distinction between technical and adaptive challenges
– Our relationship/resistance to change
– Authority vs. leadership

We’ll take the scenic route to understanding how to cultivate EQ and unleash its power in exercising leadership and managing change.

To get the most out of my session attendees should have: No prior knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: 3-7 years experience

B.J. Rogers, CAWA  Vice President, ProLearning  ASPCA
B.J. leads the team responsible for ASPCApro.org – the premier online resource for professionals in animal welfare – providing content and resources to support the critical work of shelters and rescues around the country. Prior to joining the ASPCA, B.J. led the Humane Society of Chittenden County.
B.J. has held various executive positions in the human service sector and has worked in higher education as both an instructor and researcher, and in politics as a press secretary and senior campaign staff. He’s a Certified Animal Welfare Administrator (CAWA), a Certified Dialogue Education Teacher (CDET) and has training in mediation and Appreciative Inquiry.

 

SATURDAY TRACK B

The 360 Degree Professional: Focusing On Success; Not Supervision

How do you get employees to succeed in an animal shelter? Create a culture of continuous improvement and professional growth. Coach them for success instead of focusing on punitive measures by training and mentoring for the skill sets necessary for every professional working in animal welfare. Hear how an organization developed a program designed to increase retention and inspire success for improved work performance by creating the 360 Degree Professional Career Development program through which employees attain success through self-evaluation and growth by using success discussions resulting in an individual development plans.

Click here to download slides for this presentation

To get the most out of my session attendees should have: Basic knowledge of topic

Session is geared towards: 3-7 years experience

Katherine Shenar, Chief of Staff, San Diego Humane Society
Katherine Shenar is San Diego Humane Society’s Chief of Staff. Her advocacy work started 20 years ago at the Humane Society of Missouri. After seven years, she became Executive Director for Animal Protective Association of Missouri, followed by becoming the Animal Welfare Issues Consultant for The Humane Society Of The United States where she published articles in Animal Sheltering magazine and authored Coalition Building for Animal Care Organizations. She then became President/CEO of Asheville Humane Society in North Carolina. Katherine holds a master’s degree and lives with her husband, two dogs, two cats, and a stream of foster kittens.

 

Reimaging Organizational Culture by Reimaging the Relationship

The presentation and interactive conversation provides an opportunity to study an organization that for a long time, did not know it was heading for difficulty and was not functioning as it should. Participants will be given an inside look and will be able to follow the trajectory of an organization in difficulty back on its pathway towards improved function.

The program will be broken into four component parts: 1) The Beginning, or How Bad Can It Be, 2) The Pivot, or the Board Attempts to Take Charge, 3) Board/ED: A New Relationship, 4) Board Chair/ED: What Makes the Relationship Work?

Click here to download slides for this presentation.

To get the most out of my session attendees should have: Basic knowledge of topic

Session is geared towards: 0-3 years experience

Ellen Sharon, Board President, Connecticut Humane Society
Ellen Sharon is the fifth Connecticut Humane Society (CHS) Board President. She was a “Foster Mom” for 15 years and Fox Memorial Clinic Board member from 2007 to 2011, when it consolidated with the CHS Board. She is a CPA starting out with KPMG, was CFO for Chase Enterprises Radio Group, founded her 25-year-old news monitoring company, CompetitivEdge, and recently joined Nathan Liverant and Son Antiques. She serves as Chair of the Colchester Historic District Commission. Ellen resides in Colchester, Connecticut with her two dogs, Darla and Punxsatawney Phil, Tigger the cat, and her highly comical Senegal Parrot, Nkonoki.

 

Optimized Chaos  Part 1 & 2

If we could get everybody in our organizations working together effectively, the sum would be greater than the parts. That’s the theory. But the truth of collaboration is it’s hard, messy and sometimes less – not more – productive. We’ll look at examples of collaboration in both small and large organizations and practice with some tools to figure out your best options for leveraging communication and collaboration to get more and better work accomplished.

To get the most out of my session attendees should have: management experience

Session is geared towards: 3-7 years experience

Bert Troughton, MSW, Senior Vice President of Strategy, ASPCA
As SVP of Strategy, Bert helps 900+ staff successfully weave their efforts together to achieve targeted outcomes. She joined the ASPCA after nine years as CEO of Monadnock Humane Society and ten years as a clinical social worker before that. Past president of both the New Hampshire and New England Federations of Humane Societies, Bert received the 2004 Excellence in Teaching award from AHA. Bert is a guest blogger on human dynamics in animal sheltering on the aspcapro.org blog and the author of the chapter on working with adopters in the Shelter Animal Behavior Textbook. She authored the ASPCA/Petfinder shelter management page from 2000 – 2003 and co-authored A Business Planning Guide for Shelters.

 

SUNDAY KEYNOTE

With Amy Mills, CEO, Emancipet

Amy has spent her career studying social change and developing strategies to solve tough social problems. In 2006, Amy became CEO of Emancipet, a non-profit on a mission to make veterinary care affordable and accessible for all pet owners. Emancipet operates clinics in four cities in Texas and is opening its first clinic outside of Texas, in Philadelphia, in 2016. As CEO, Amy leads the organization’s strategic growth initiatives: opening new clinics in underserved communities, providing training and consulting programs to animal welfare organizations, and advocating for strategies and public policy that improve the lives of pets in underserved communities. She holds a Bachelors Degree from St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas and is a 2011 graduate of Leadership Austin.

SUNDAY TRACK A

asv logo

Sunday Track A sessions are geared toward veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and medical personnel. These sessions are RACE approved and co-hosted by the Association of Shelter Veterinarians.

This program is approved by the AAVSB RACE to offer a total of 6.00 CE Credits (6.00 max) being available to any one veterinarian: and/or 6.00 Veterinary Technician CE Credits (6.00 max). This RACE approval is for the subject matter categorie(s) of: Category One: Scientific using the delivery method(s) of: Seminar/Lecture. This approval is valid in jurisdictions which recognize AAVSB RACE; however, participants are responsible for ascertaining each board’s CE requirements.

 

Pain Management in the Shelter Setting for Dogs, Cats and Rabbits

This session will discuss the latest advances in techniques and the newest analgesic drugs that can be applied in a shelter setting. Acute and Chronic pain management in dogs, cats and rabbits will be reviewed. In addition the use of local anesthetic agents in these species will be discussed.

Click here to download slides for this presentation.

To get the most out of my session attendees should have: Basic knowledge of topic

Session is geared towards: 0-3 years experience

Emily McCobb DVM MS DACVAA, Clinical Associate Professor, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, Program Director, Tufts Shelter Medicine Program
Emily McCobb is a clinical associate professor of Anesthesiology at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine and director of Tufts Shelter Medicine Program. Dr. McCobb also serves as Assistant Director for the Center for Animals and Public Policy. In addition to clinical responsibilities, Dr. McCobb teaches and mentors veterinary and masters students on a variety of companion animal welfare related topics including euthanasia, pain management, and shelter medicine and policy. She is involved in the school’s efforts to increase veterinary care provided to under served pet owners through outreach and the continued development of the field of community based veterinary medicine.

 

Diagnosis and Management of Skin Diseases: Improving Outcomes for Shelter Dogs

Skin diseases are common and owner frustration with their management often results in relinquishment of dogs to rescue groups and shelters. In addition, dogs that are forced to live in the wild easily acquire parasitic and infectious diseases, which are exacerbated by stress and poor nutrition. In this seminar, we will discuss the skin diseases commonly seen in shelter pets, how to diagnose them, and how to treat them. Emphasis will be placed on updated methodology and treatment approaches. We will also discuss differentiating curable skin diseases from noncurable diseases, and the ethical responsibility of shelters and rescue groups to provide accurate and honest health information to potential adopters.

To get the most out of my session attendees should have: Basic knowledge of topic

Session is geared towards: 3-7 years experience

Valerie A. Fadok, DVM, PhD, Diplomate, ACVD, Dermatologist, Zoetis
Dr. Valerie Fadok received her DVM from WSU in 1978, and completed internship in small animal medicine and surgery at the West Los Angeles Veterinary Medical Group. A residency in veterinary dermatology followed at the UFCVM, and.Fadok became board-certified in 1982. She earned a PhD in Experimental Pathology at the UCHSCin 1991. Dr. Fadok has worked on faculty at UTCVM, the UFCVM, Texas A & M University, and National Jewish Health. The last 11 years she has been in private practice in Houston. She currently works for Zoetis as part of the Veterinary Professional Services Team. Dr. Fadok has lectured internationally, nationally, and locally , and was a dermatology consultant on the Veterinary Information Network (VIN) for several years.

 

Recognizing and Reporting Animal Cruelty

Animal cruelty is a legal determination. This lecture will focus on recognizing and reporting animal cruelty based on historical information and the animal’s health status, whether a complaint is made by a member of the public, or the animal presents at an animal shelter or an animal hospital. An overview of the ASPCA-NYPD Partnership in NYC and its effect on the fight against animal cruelty in NYC will be presented. Case information will be presented to illustrate different aspects of animal cruelty cases.

 

The Practice of Forensic Veterinary Medicine – Case Presentation

This lecture will be an introduction to the practice of forensic veterinary medicine with the presentation of cases of criminal neglect, non-accidental injury and dog fighting. Numerous resources that are available to assist veterinarians with animal cruelty case work will be discussed

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: No prior knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: 0-3 years experience

Dr. Robert Reisman, Supervisor of Forensic Sciences ASPCA New York City, American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA)
Dr. Reisman is a 1980 graduate of the New York State College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University. He is currently Supervisor of Forensic Sciences at the ASPCA in New York City.
Dr. Reisman has received many distinctions for his dedication to fighting animal cruelty, including: the Brooklyn District Attorney’s “Making A Difference” Award (2010), the Veterinary Medical Association of New York City and the New York State Veterinary Medical Society – Outstanding Service to Veterinary Medicine (2016).
Dr. Reisman has authored and co-authored, book chapters and scientific journal articles about veterinary forensic medicine. He has delivered lectures and presentations on Forensic Veterinary Medicine in New York City and nationally.

 

SUNDAY TRACK B

Digging into Community Pet Issues: Using Collaborations to Ensure You Don’t Get Buried

In our work as animal welfare professionals, we recognize recurring themes like access to veterinary care as a community need, and we ponder that we’d like to tackle the challenge, IF ONLY the right resources were in place. Whether you’re a start-up, a well-established group, or looking to answer a great community need, you cannot and should not go it alone. Come along on CHS’s journey as it has launched a pilot initiative in collaboration with municipal, foundation, and nonprofit partners designed to make some waves. Leave with ideas and actionable steps for developing and sustaining an initiative that is both feasible for your organization and impactful in the community – with the help of friends.

Click here to download the slides for this presentation.

Click here to download handouts for this presentation.

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: No prior knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: Any level of experience

Elizabeth Timpe, Community Outreach Manager, Connecticut Humane Society
Elizabeth is responsible for developing and delivering outreach and educational programs that promote the vision and mission of the Connecticut Humane Society, including training workshops for animal welfare professionals, public wellness clinics, and youth and family programs. Elizabeth graduated from the University of Rhode Island with a bachelor’s degree in Biological Science and went on to earn Masters degrees from the University of Tulsa and the University of Connecticut. A love of pets and wildlife from an early age led Elizabeth to focus on a career in animal science. She finds it incredibly rewarding that by simply sharing information and resources with pet owners in the community, a quick and positive change can be made in the lives of pets.

Kerry Garofano, CFRE, Stewardship Manager, Connecticut Humane Society
As the Connecticut Humane Society’s Stewardship Manager, Kerry identifies, solicits, and stewards gifts from individual donors and foundations. With personal experience showing there are many pathways into the animal welfare field, Kerry’s role is to share CT Humane’s tireless work to save pets’ lives and engage others in this legacy. She holds a B.S. in Biology from Union College, and a M.S. in Animals and Public Policy from Tufts Veterinary School. She earned her Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE) credential in 2015, demonstrating excellence in professional practice, knowledge and ethics in the field of fundraising.

 

First, We Listen: Developing Social Change Initiatives

Social Change transforms cultural norms and societal behavior patterns by changing the hearts and minds of individuals. The key to designing a successful new program, service, or campaign for social change is authentic engagement with the very people whose behavior you hope will change. Easier said than done! This session will be an in-depth look at the first phase of program design – why it matters, how to do it, and what to make of what you learn.

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: No prior knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: 3-7 years of experience

Amy Mills, CEO, Emancipet
Amy has served as the CEO of Emancipet since 2006. Emancipet is a national non-profit on a mission to make veterinary care affordable and accessible to all pet owners, and to equip change makers and animal advocates to transform their communities to keep more pets and people together. Her areas of expertise include social change strategy, mindful leadership, organizational culture, and the bond between people and pets. She graduated from St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas, where she lives with four elderly dogs and a cat.

 

Mapping The Career Path No One Told You About

Whether you stumbled, tripped or purposefully walked into animal welfare as a profession, no one could have adequately prepared you for the challenges and growth opportunities you’d encounter in your career from entry level to executive management. Hear from industry veterans, who understand the unique challenges faced by animal welfare employees and how you can circumvent barriers, eliminate roadblocks and map out a career that engages your passions without hiring a life coach.

This presentation will feature real world testimonials from multiple animal welfare professionals and provide case studies that will resonate with the audience. These will be the secrets you wish someone had shared with you when you first began working in animal welfare. The intent of the presentation is to provide leadership and guidance to those just entering the industry, middle managers, and even those who are navigating the executive leadership for the first time.

Click here to download slides for this presentation

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: No prior knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: 0-3 years of experience

Katherine Shenar, Chief of Staff, San Diego Humane Society
Katherine Shenar is San Diego Humane Society’s Chief of Staff. Her advocacy work started 20 years ago at the Humane Society of Missouri. After seven years, she became Executive Director for Animal Protective Association of Missouri, followed by becoming the Animal Welfare Issues Consultant for The Humane Society Of The United States where she published articles in Animal Sheltering magazine and authored Coalition Building for Animal Care Organizations. She then became President/CEO of Asheville Humane Society in North Carolina. Katherine holds a master’s degree and lives with her husband, two dogs, two cats, and a stream of foster kittens.

Jim Tedford, President & CEO, The Society of Animal Welfare Administrators (SAWA)
Jim Tedford serves as President & CEO for the Society of Animal Welfare Administrators (SAWA), a professional association of leaders in the fields of animal welfare and animal care & control. Jim started his career thirty-two years ago serving on the front line of animal welfare. He has been CEO for organizations in New York, Louisiana and Tennessee. He served as a regional director for The Humane Society of the United States and as volunteer board chair for SAWA. Jim holds a degree in animal science from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

 

Food for Thought

“No-kill or kill?  Open or closed admission?  Shelter or rescue?  By creating a label to define ourselves, we automatically create an ‘other’, and typically the ‘other’ is viewed as ‘wrong’. Can we separate ourselves from these labels and take an objective look at what they mean, how they influence the way we work and their effect on organizational cooperation? Instead of feeding into a negative dichotomy, can we creatively re-work labels to encourage teamwork in the field and provide the public with a positive perspective of our work? All of this (and more!) will be discussed during this year’s Food for Thought!”

Amy Duskiewicz, Shelter Manager, Providence Animal Rescue League
Amy has been working in the Animal Welfare field for over a decade. During that time she has worked in various organizations across New England as well as Louisiana. With these organizations Amy has held almost every position, from kennel worker to veterinary technician, to volunteer coordinator and manager. She is currently the Shelter Manager with the Providence Animal Rescue League in Rhode Island. She enjoys working with her staff to come up with creative solutions to the unique challenges that arise every day.

Katie Hansberry, Senior State Director HSUS
As Maine senior state director for the Humane Society of the United States, Katie Hansberry works to support animal welfare legislation, fight animal cruelty in all forms, and engage citizens to promote the protection of all animals. She serves as Vice President for the Maine Federation of Humane Societies, Secretary for the State of Maine Animal Resource Team and an advisory board member for the New England Federation of Humane Societies. She received her bachelor’s degree from Bowdoin College, and after graduating from Boston College Law School and practicing as a civil litigation attorney, decided to pursue a career in the animal welfare field and joined HSUS in 2012. She resides in Portland with her cats Goody and Boots, as well as, her Corgis, Scully and Mulder. 

 

SUNDAY TRACK C

Effective Applications for Training & Enrichment for Sheltered Cats

Through the lens of animal welfare science, this presentation will present effective ways to use training and enrichment to improve the welfare of the cats housed in animal shelters. An overview of The Five Freedoms and the sensory capabilities of cats will provide the foundation for how to use these lenses when designing, implementing and evaluating various training and enrichment programs within an animal shelter. Examples of successful programs like the Jackson Galaxy Foundation’s Cat Pawsitive Program, Canisius College’s Kittens on Campus, and SPCA Serving Erie County’s Pawsitive Journeys will be provided in order to inspire others to find creative ways to improve the lives of sheltered cats.

Click here to download slides for this presentation

To get the most out of my session attendees should have: Basic knowledge of topic

Session is geared towards: 0-3 years experience

Miranda K. Workman, MS, CABC, CBCC-KA, CPDT-KSA, Clinical Assistant Professor, Canisius College
After a career as an animal behavior specialist in both private practice and shelters, Miranda now serves as a clinical assistant professor in the Animal Behavior, Ecology, and Conservation department at Canisius College in Buffalo, NY. As an anthrozoologist, her research focuses on the intersection of human and animal worlds, particularly companion animal related topics. Currently, she also serves as Chair of the Cat Division and founding member of the Shelter Division of IAABC. The Jackson Galaxy Foundation has also selected Miranda as the lead Trainer/Mentor for the Cat Pawsitive Initiative. She and her husband share their home with four dogs, six cats, and a leopard gecko.

 

Give ‘em a Ride: Best Practices for Transport of Companion Animals

In 2016 the Society of Animal Welfare Administrators (SAWA) released its first ever “Best Practice” document focused on transport programs as a life-saving tool. SAWA’s Best Practices & Emerging Trends Committee is made up of some of the best and brightest minds in the field. The team put together a comprehensive best practice document outlining the optimum ways to design and manage a transport program – from the standpoint of both “source” and ‘destination” organizations.
Learn from SAWA’s CEO and one of Committee Co-Chairs how to do it right. You will be challenged to make changes to benefit your extremely precious “cargo” as they take their journey to a long, happy life.

Click here to download slides for this presentation.

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: No prior knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: Any level of experience

Jim Tedford, President & CEO, The Society of Animal Welfare Administrators (SAWA)
Jim Tedford serves as President & CEO for the Society of Animal Welfare Administrators (SAWA), a professional association of leaders in the fields of animal welfare and animal care & control. Jim started his career thirty-two years ago serving on the front line of animal welfare. He has been CEO for organizations in New York, Louisiana and Tennessee. He served as a regional director for The Humane Society of the United States and as volunteer board chair for SAWA. Jim holds a degree in animal science from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

Brad Shear, President & CEO, Mohawk Hudson Humane Society
Brad Shear, CAWA, is President and Chief Executive Officer of the Mohawk Hudson Humane Society. He has worked in animal protection since 1996 and has led the Society since April 2007. Previously Shear held leadership roles with the Atlanta Humane Society, New York City Animal Care & Control and the Humane Society of Boulder Valley.
Shear serves as the President of the Board of the New York State Animal Protection Federation, and serves on the boards of Community Works of New York State and the Society of Animal Welfare Administrators.

 

The Volunteer Connection

What does it take to make your volunteer and staff connect? This workshop covers creative volunteer recruitment and retention efforts, highlighting youth entry volunteer programs, cat and dog task force responsibilities, volunteer appreciation, communication methods, mentor programs and how we utilize community events to bring our staff and volunteers together. We will highlight the importance of putting in the extra effort to make every part of the team feel welcome and vital to the success of the organization by honing their assignments to their skills and interests.

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: No prior knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: 0-3 years experience

Crystal Arnott, Communications & Fundraising Manager, Lowell Humane Society
Crystal doesn’t call herself a crazy cat lady, but everyone who knows her does. When she’s not saving lives at Lowell Humane Society or out trapping cats to TNR, she volunteers with Missing Dogs Massachusetts; trapping lost dogs. In her free time she enjoys hiking with her dogs, snuggling up with her cats and a good book, or binge-watching cheesy tv with her husband. Her biggest dream is to one day cuddle her indoor feral cat Peanut, she’s just so fluffy!

 

Food for Thought

“No-kill or kill?  Open or closed admission?  Shelter or rescue?  By creating a label to define ourselves, we automatically create an ‘other’, and typically the ‘other’ is viewed as ‘wrong’. Can we separate ourselves from these labels and take an objective look at what they mean, how they influence the way we work and their effect on organizational cooperation? Instead of feeding into a negative dichotomy, can we creatively re-work labels to encourage teamwork in the field and provide the public with a positive perspective of our work? All of this (and more!) will be discussed during this year’s Food for Thought!”

Amy Duskiewicz, Shelter Manager, Providence Animal Rescue League
Amy has been working in the Animal Welfare field for over a decade. During that time she has worked in various organizations across New England as well as Louisiana. With these organizations Amy has held almost every position, from kennel worker to veterinary technician, to volunteer coordinator and manager. She is currently the Shelter Manager with the Providence Animal Rescue League in Rhode Island. She enjoys working with her staff to come up with creative solutions to the unique challenges that arise every day.

Katie Hansberry, Senior State Director HSUS
As Maine senior state director for the Humane Society of the United States, Katie Hansberry works to support animal welfare legislation, fight animal cruelty in all forms, and engage citizens to promote the protection of all animals. She serves as Vice President for the Maine Federation of Humane Societies, Secretary for the State of Maine Animal Resource Team and an advisory board member for the New England Federation of Humane Societies. She received her bachelor’s degree from Bowdoin College, and after graduating from Boston College Law School and practicing as a civil litigation attorney, decided to pursue a career in the animal welfare field and joined HSUS in 2012. She resides in Portland with her cats Goody and Boots, as well as, her Corgis, Scully and Mulder. 

MONDAY TRACK A

Dogs Playing for Life™: A Training Program for Shelter Dogs Featuring Play Groups

As our industry evolves in response to changing demands, efficient and effective programming to best support sheltered animals does, as well. In this presentation, packed with over an hour of dynamic video examples, you will learn how much positive impact daily play groups can have on the quality of life of sheltered dogs, assessing behavior more accurately, attracting volunteers and pleasing staff and enhancing the adoption matching process. Dogs Playing for Life™has been introduced to over 170 shelters internationally. Come join us for an informative and entertaining presentation that will share the foundation for our successful life-saving programs. Dogs live to PLAY…now let them play to LIVE.

Click here to download the DPFL Impact Report.

Click here to download the DPFL Manual.

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: No prior knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: 0-3 years experience

Emily Grossheider, Director of Development, Dogs Playing for Life
Emily was raised by a lab mix & two cats in Northern California. After graduating from UCSB, Emily accepted a position at Dog Adoption and Welfare Group where she increased adoptions over 100%. Following her tenure at DAWG, Emily became the Director of the Santa Ynez Humane Society. In her ongoing efforts to improve the training of her staff and ultimately enrich the lives of the animals in her charge, Emily met the Dogs Playing for Life team, which she enthusiastically joined as Director of Development in 2015. Emily lives in Santa Barbara, California with her ornery rescue mutt Blackjack.

 

Fostering Fostering: Creating, Growing & Maintaining a Successful Foster Program

As bottle baby and underage kittens are now recognized as one of the largest underserved and at-risk populations in shelters and rescues, organizations are faced with challenges of how to effectively and economically house, care for and save more lives. This workshop presents numerous options and strategies for creating, growing and maintaining a successful foster program that is applicable for kittens and other sheltered pets, too. From administrative approval and budget concerns to recruiting, training and keeping volunteers, this workshop covers fostering issues from all sides. Attendees will go home with proven ideas to immediately start saving more lives.

Click here to download slides for this presentation.

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: Basic knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: 0-3 years experience

Rosemarie Crawford, LVT, Executive Director, The National Kitten Coalition
Rosemarie Crawford is a licensed veterinary technician with nearly 20 years’ experience in animal welfare. She served as the foster coordinator in both private and municipal shelters and understands the challenges -and rewards- of creating, expanding and maintaining foster programs. As a medical staff member in an open-admission shelter, she worked with veterinarians to provide for the animals’ medical and surgical needs, and she also volunteered with several national organizations to rescue and care for animals following disasters. In 2008, she co-founded The National Kitten Coalition and currently presents workshops across the country on increasing survival rates of rescued kittens.

Rebecca Jewell, Special Projects Manager, The National Kitten Coalition
Rebecca Jewell is Marketing & Special Projects Manager for The National Kitten Coalition. She has more than 10 years’ experience in animal welfare, primarily at open admission shelters. Rebecca has created and managed multiple outreach programs and has supervised front counter operations. Her first love, however, is foster programs. Seeing the need for temporary out-of-shelter housing and care for felines, especially kittens, prompted the creation of foster programs at two very different shelters. And, in both cases, the community embraced the program. She believes that not only do foster programs save lives, they galvanize communities and inspire staff and volunteers.

 

Reaching with the Next Generation: Connecting with the fastest growing segment of adopters

Millennials are the fastest growing segment of pet adopters, they are also a generation that is heavily influenced by technology in their daily interactions. Information, organization, and their tendency to select services based on their online presence can be intimidating. Yet left un-addressed, it can be disastrous for an organization . In this workshop you will learn tips for how to connect your shelter to the tech driven generation to increase adoption and build life-time relationships with young, new pet parents.

Click here to download the slides for this presentation.

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: No prior knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: 3-7 years of experience

Lorien Clemens, Director of Marketing & Municipal Programs PetHub, Inc.

Lorien Clemens serves as Director of Marketing at PetHub, Inc. Lorien joined PetHub, Inc., in June 2011 as the little start-up was just a wee pup. Since her joining PetHub, the lost pet recovery software service has become a respected industry leader. She has guided PetHub to its wins of multiple pet industry awards, including two Dog Fancy Magazine Editors’ Choice Awards, the PetAGE Magazine Retailer Silver Select Award.

Individually, Lorien was named the Pet Industry Network’s 2014 Pet Industry Woman of the Year and was a keynote speaker at their national conference in 2015. In early 2016, Lorien was also honored by PetAGE Magazine as one the pet industry’s Women of Influence.

Rebecca Breese, Assistant Director of Municipal Programs PetHub, Inc.

Rebecca Breese is the Assistant Director of Municipality Programs for PetHub. She is also the proud mom to rescue dogs Pepper and Maple and cat Sylive. Rebecca has been in the active in the pet industry for last four years, including being a finalist in the Women in the Pet Industry “Rising Star” category. Today she works with municipalities in improving their dog registration programs to help get pets home faster.

 

Bringing it Home: From the Workshop to the Real World

You know the story – great conference, compelling workshops, inspiring ideas. You return to your day job eager instigate change, only to be quickly consumed by. . .well. . .your day job. With progress relying on your ability to communicate your learning and convince your organization that change is worthwhile, you may face a daunting climb up a steep hill.

Good news: anyone – rookie or experienced exec – can exercise leadership and make change happen. We’ll identify opportunities for change straight from your time at THIS conference, and strategize how to bring that learning home and make change happen.

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: No prior knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: Any level of experience

B.J. Rogers, CAWA, Vice President, ProLearning, ASPCA
B.J. leads the team responsible for ASPCApro.org – the premier online resource for professionals in animal welfare – providing content and resources to support the critical work of shelters and rescues around the country. Prior to joining the ASPCA, B.J. led the Humane Society of Chittenden County.

B.J. has held various executive positions in the human service sector and has worked in higher education as both an instructor and researcher, and in politics as a press secretary and senior campaign staff. He’s a Certified Animal Welfare Administrator (CAWA), a Certified Dialogue Education Teacher (CDET) and has training in mediation and Appreciative Inquiry.

 

MONDAY TRACK B

Overcoming Barriers to Pet Adoption

Over 16 million people bring a new pet into their homes each year. Only 25% of these pets are adopted from shelters or rescue organizations. We’ve worked with adopters and non-adopters to better understand their perceptions of pet adoption and pet welfare organizations. Learn the results of research that digs into WHY such a small percentage of new pets are adopted – and leave with tactics on HOW to change those perceptions.

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: Intermediate knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: 3-7 years experience

Sara Kent, Director, Petfinder Shelter Outreach, Petfinder/Nestle Purina PetCare
Sara Kent is Director of Shelter Outreach for Petfinder at Nestlé Purina PetCare. Sara oversees the professional side of Petfinder, dedicated to providing tools and resources to animal shelters and rescue groups. She lives with several adopted pets, including a tarantula, two mixed breed dogs, three house cats and the occasional foster cat, along with a very understanding husband and step-daughter. She cares for her neighborhood TNR community cats and serves as a board member for the Animal Welfare Federation of New Jersey. Sara was one of the first employees at Petfinder in 2000 and joined Nestlé Purina PetCare in 2013.

 

The Power of Kindness

People are the greatest and most essential tool in the animal welfare movement, and the human animal bond crosses all boundaries. In this thought provoking session we will explore strategies and techniques of effective communication, cultural competency, and how we can engage people most effectively, in order to create long lasting systemic change for animals.

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: No knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: Any level of experience

Kenny Lamberti, Acting Vice President, HSUS/companion animals
Kenny Lamberti is Acting Vice President for the Companion Animals department of The Humane Society of the United States and played a key role in the creation and implementation of its Pets for Life program. Kenny came to The HSUS with a background in social work, teaching and grass roots community organizing. Kenny has led community-based programs for nationally recognized organizations such as the YMCA, Harvard University and the Boston Public Schools. Kenny is a champion of equality and inclusion, which has framed his holistic approach to engaging animal lovers and advocates from diverse backgrounds, with the hope of creating a more humane global community.

Keep Those Tails Waggin’! Utilizing Teamwork and Furry-Fun to Prevent and Address Compassion Fatigue

Feeling like you need a cat nap that lasts for days? This presentation will help you recognize and define compassion fatigue and share strategies to combat it with you, your staff, and volunteers.
We’re all familiar with the symptoms of compassion fatigue professionals caution us with, but do you know how to address this cat when it gets out of the bag? Together, we will share the research on compassion fatigue, and brainstorm creative and actionable ways to prevent-and treat-the issue by utilizing teamwork, positive communication, and lots of paw-ty’s!

Click here to download the compassion fatigue workbook.

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: No prior knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: Any level of experience

Emily Grossheider, Director of Development, Dogs Playing for Life
Emily was raised by a lab mix & two cats in Northern California. After graduating from UCSB, Emily accepted a position at Dog Adoption and Welfare Group where she increased adoptions over 100%. Following her tenure at DAWG, Emily became the Director of the Santa Ynez Humane Society. In her ongoing efforts to improve the training of her staff and ultimately enrich the lives of the animals in her charge, Emily met the Dogs Playing for Life team, which she enthusiastically joined as Director of Development in 2015. Emily lives in Santa Barbara, California with her ornery rescue mutt Blackjack.

 

Bringing it Home: From the Workshop to the Real World

You know the story – great conference, compelling workshops, inspiring ideas. You return to your day job eager instigate change, only to be quickly consumed by. . .well. . .your day job. With progress relying on your ability to communicate your learning and convince your organization that change is worthwhile, you may face a daunting climb up a steep hill.

Good news: anyone – rookie or experienced exec – can exercise leadership and make change happen. We’ll identify opportunities for change straight from your time at THIS conference, and strategize how to bring that learning home and make change happen.

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: No prior knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: Any level of experience

B.J. Rogers, CAWA, Vice President, ProLearning, ASPCA
B.J. leads the team responsible for ASPCApro.org – the premier online resource for professionals in animal welfare – providing content and resources to support the critical work of shelters and rescues around the country. Prior to joining the ASPCA, B.J. led the Humane Society of Chittenden County.

B.J. has held various executive positions in the human service sector and has worked in higher education as both an instructor and researcher, and in politics as a press secretary and senior campaign staff. He’s a Certified Animal Welfare Administrator (CAWA), a Certified Dialogue Education Teacher (CDET) and has training in mediation and Appreciative Inquiry.

 

MONDAY TRACK C

Creating Effective Behavior Modification Plans

Both cats and dogs come into the shelter with a variety of behavioral problems and more may turn up as a result of stress. However, many of these problems can be managed and treated if you have a plan! This presentation will go over the details of creating and applying behavior modification plans for both cats and dogs. Four “toolboxes” will be introduced from which behavior change strategies and procedures will be chosen and an individualized plan can be constructed. With daily scheduling strategies, data collection and counseling for adopters, learn to successfully implement your plan in a shelter environment.

Click here to download slides for this presentation.

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: No prior knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: 0-3 years of experience

Anastacia Southland, Behavior Services Manager, Potter League for Animals
Anastacia Southland obtained her Bachelor’s degree in animal behavior from Wheaton College. During this time, she completed internships with dog behavior consultants and participated in behavioral research with zoo animals. She also has a Master’s degree in Animals and Public Policy from Tufts University where she studied shelter policy and human-animal interactions. Prior to becoming Behavior Services Manager at the Potter League for Animals, she spent 5 years as their Humane Educator. She is passionate about helping animals through their shelter stay and setting their new families up for success.

 

Preparing for Placement – Distinguish the animal as an individual, and quickly identify what characteristics can be strengthened.

For dog lovers and professionals alike, this presentation will educate attendees to a deeper understanding of the individual dog. You will learn to quickly identify fundamental characteristics such as sociability, persistence, use of space, and more. This knowledge will guide your training plan and assist you in setting clear expectations as to which behaviors can be modified and which are hard wired.
Skills Learned:
* Improve observational skills
* Understand temperament traits
* Collaborate, giving the dog a choice in his placement.
* A Recipe for relationship building
* Setting real expectations for adopters

 

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: No prior knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: 0-3 years of experience

Judy Rapp Moore, ACDBC, CPDT-KA, BS,   Associate Certified Dog Behavior Consultant,   Owner, Canine Behavior Counseling, LLC,  National Trainer, Pets for Vets, Inc.
Judy Moore is the owner of Canine Behavior Counseling, LLC. located in Cumberland, Maine. Judy has been a Certified Dog Trainer for 10 years, an Associate Certified Dog Behavior Consultant for 5 years and a National Trainer for Pets for Vets for 2 years. Judy presents nationally on Canine Body Language and is the author of Drop The Leash, a dog training DVD. She is a regular contributor to Maine Dog Magazine and was recently honored to be included in Thoroughly Reviewed‘s Top 50 Dog Training Bloggers!

 

New Hope for Fighting Dogs

Understanding how dogs are bred, raised and trained for organized fighting reveals why there are dramatic individual differences in their behavior. After rescue, some can make wonderful pets and companions, while others pose a serious danger and should not be placed in adoptive homes. In this presentation, I expose how fighters prepare their dogs for the pit and describe how these dogs are different from other pit bull type dogs. I demonstrate how we evaluate dogs from fight busts and how we use our observations to guide disposition decisions, including euthanasia, rehabilitation and adoption.

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: No prior knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: 0-3 years of experience

Dr. Pamela Reid, PhD., ASPCA, Anti-Cruelty Behavior Team
Pamela Reid, PhD, is a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist and serves as VP of the ASPCA’s Anti-Cruelty Behavior Team (ACBT) and the Behavioral Rehabilitation Center (BRC). Dr. Reid oversees behavior evaluations, enrichment and rehabilitation for animals seized in dogfighting, puppy mill and hoarding cases. Through specialized assessments, the ACBT gathers information to determine the best outcomes for cruelty case victims and provides supporting evidence and expert testimony for prosecution. Animals considered unadoptable for behavior reasons are channeled to the BRC, where the team implements treatments designed to reduce fear and anxiety and help neglected, undersocialized dogs become suitable for adoption.

Christina Lee, MA, CPDT-KA, Animal Behavior Counselor, Anti-Cruelty Behavior Team
Christina Lee is a Behavior Counselor with the ASPCA’s Anti-Cruelty Behavior Team (ACBT) and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer. She works with animals that come to the ASPCA shelter through NYPD and Cruelty Intervention Advocacy cases. She assesses the cats upon intake and then creates and implements behavior modification programs for each cat, as necessary. Christina also conducts forensic behavior evaluations on dogs that are housed off-site and works in the field with animals rescued through the ASPCA’s Field Investigation & Response Team. These animals come from a multitude of backgrounds, including dog fighting cases, hoarder homes, and puppy mills.

 

Lifestyle Changing Animals: Placing the Challenging Dogs

These days it seems that every shelter has some dogs that present with extremely challenging behavior, whether it be a history of problematic behavior in their previous home or behaviors of concern exhibited in the shelter. Trying to find the right home for these dogs can be challenging. Many adopters don’t really understand what they are getting themselves into when they adopt a challenging dog and become frustrated and discouraged with the dog and the shelter. This workshop will discuss how to find the “right” adopter and what information should be shared with them before they commit to the dog.

To get the most out of my sessions attendees should have: Basic knowledge of topic needed

Session is geared towards: Any level of experience

Kelley Bollen, MS, CABC, Certified Animal Behavior Consultant, Executive Director – Animal Alliances, LLC
Kelley Bollen, MS, CABC is a Certified Animal Behavior Consultant with a Master’s degree in Animal Behavior who has specialized in shelter behavioral care for over sixteen years. Kelley is the owner of Animal Alliances – an animal behavior consulting business and she consults with animal shelters across the country. Kelley is a Faculty Fellow for the Center for Animals in Public Policy at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts where she also serves on the Shelter Medicine Program’s Academic Steering Committee. Kelley is the former Director of Behavior Programs for the Maddie’s Shelter Medicine Program at Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine.